Applied Trophology, Vol. 1, No. 2: Acidosis and Alkalosis; New Aid for Incurable Disease; Chlorophyll Ointment in Decubitus Ulcers; Choline in Liver Metabolism; Effects on Bile Flow of Choline; Pancreas and Cholesterol; Potassium in Bulbar Poliomyelitis; Tip of the Month (High Blood pH)

Contents in Volume 1, Number 2 (February 1957): Acidosis and Alkalosis, New Aid for Incurable Disease Told, Chlorophyll Ointment Heals Decubitus Ulcers, Choline Prevents Fatty Change and Cirrhosis in the Livers of Dogs Subjected to Hypophysectomy and Thyroidectomy, Lipid Content and Volume of Bile Secreted by Choline-Deficient Rats with Fatty Livers, Items of Interest (The […]

The Vitamins in Medicine, Part 1 (Vitamin A and the B Complex)

By Franklin Bicknell, MD, and Frederick Prescott, MD

Summary: Nutrition and medicine have seldom seen eye to eye. Though the discovery of the vitamins in the early twentieth century did cause some physicians to grasp the profound connection between vitamin deficiencies and degenerative disease, medicine as an institution never truly embraced this idea. Ultimately, the American Medical Association declared—in concert with the industrial food industry and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration—that most Americans do not suffer vitamin deficiencies of any consequence. This position, however, contradicts decades of scientific study, as famed natural nutritionist Dr. Royal Lee argued throughout his career. One of the books Dr. Lee cited most often in making his case was the text here, The Vitamins in Medicine, by British physicians Drs. Franklin Bicknell and Frederick Prescott. Backed by over 4500 scientific references, the text sums the totality of scientific knowledge about the vitamins at the time of its publication in the mid-twentieth century. While the book does take some typically medical views of vitamins, e.g., that they are single chemical substances and not synergistic biochemical complexes, as Dr. Lee taught, it nevertheless supports strongly the notion that many, if not most, of our modern ailments stem from partial (or “subclinical”) vitamin deficiencies. “This book not only tells of the ravages caused by ignoring nature’s ways,” Dr. Lee said, “but it also shows us the way to prevent these bodily damages.” In the first part of the text (see link to PDF below), the authors discuss vitamin A as well as the various B vitamins. In Part 2, Bicknell and Franklin go on to address vitamins C, D, E, and K and a host of other vital nutrients. Though the information in this book is over seven decades old, it is still incredibly valuable today, when so few health practitioners actually know what the vitamins do—or what a lack of them can cause. Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research, 1953. Original publisher William Heinemann, London.