Applied Trophology, Vol. 1, No. 6: Constipation Syndrome; Tip of the Month (Waning Sex Drive); Ike’s Doctor Declares

Contents in Volume 1, Number 6 (June 1957): The Constipation Syndrome, Tip of the Month (Waning Sex Drive), Ike’s Doctor Declares U.S. “Most Unhealthy in the World,” High Points of Standard Process Nutritional Adjuncts (Niacinamide B6). The following is a transcription of the June 1957 issue of Dr. Royal Lee’s Applied Trophology newsletter, originally published […]

Applied Trophology, Vol. 1, No. 1: Which Is First—Disease or the Microorganism; Science Discovers Vitamin E; Oxidative Diets; Cancer and Rancid Fats; Vitamin E in Infants; Tip of the Month (Cramps)

Contents in Volume 1, Number 1 (January 1957): Which Is First—The Disease or the Microorganism? Science Discovers Vitamin E, Oxidative Diets, Cancer and Rancid Fats, Items of Interest (Vitamin E in Infants), Tip of the Month (Cramps), Questions and Answers, High Points of Standard Process Nutritional Adjuncts (Trace Minerals-B12, Antronex, Arginex, Betaine Hydrochloride Tablets). The […]

The Prevention of Recurrence in Peptic Ulcer

By D.T. Quigley, MD

Summary: Daniel Thomas Quigley was a prominent physician at the Nebraska College of Medicine who gained national recognition with his 1929 book, The Conquest of Cancer. As his career progressed, Dr. Quigley became convinced that nutritional deficiencies play a fundamental role not just in cancer but in most of the degenerative diseases that curse modernity, as he details in his 1943 tour de force, The National Malnutrition. In the following lecture, delivered a year after publication of that book, Dr. Quigley discusses the treatment of peptic ulcer, a disease caused by the long-term consumption of refined foods, he says, such a diet inducing shortages of not just a single vitamin or mineral but of multiple nutrients. In fact, he says, degenerative illnesses are almost never due to the lack of a lone nutrient but are “in varying degrees deficiencies of all of the necessary vitamins and minerals.” This is an important point that has been virtually ignored by conventional nutrition science since its inception. In an attempt to perform experiments isolating a single variable, researchers have created a model of debatable worth in illuminating practical truths about the relationship between diet and health. As Dr. Quigley sums sardonically, “None but the laboratory animal…has a deficiency of iron alone.” Thus his therapy for ulcer, like the answer for most degenerative illnesses, is to “use natural, high-vitamin, high-mineral foods” such as milk, eggs, seafood, and raw fruits and vegetables, and to “reject non-vitamin, non-mineral foods” such as white sugar and white flour. And how long should the patient keep this up? “For life,” he says, not kidding. From The Nebraska State Medical Journal, 1945. Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research reprint 17.

The National Malnutrition

By D.T. Quigley, MD

Summary: Daniel Quigley was a physician at the Nebraska College of Medicine who rose to prominence with the 1929 publication of his book The Conquest of Cancer. Like many doctors of the time, his clinical experience led him to believe that malnutrition—due to the replacement of natural foods with industrial ones—was not only more widespread in America than the medical establishment believed, but that vitamin and mineral deficiencies, more than anything else, were responsible for the exploding rates of degenerative illness throughout the country and world. In 1943, after years of observing the successful application of whole food nutritional therapy in his practice, Dr. Quigley published the following textbook through the Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research. In it he warns Americans to avoid completely white flour, white sugar, and corn syrup, each of the refined products fostering disease by delivering calories but precious few of the micronutrients needed by the body for proper function and fighting infection. For optimal nutrition Dr. Quigley recommends a diet of raw milk, eggs, whole grains, seafood, organ meats, fresh vegetables, yeast, and butter—a prescription of highly nutrient dense foods that makes just as much sense today as it did then, when these substances were known to nutritionists simply as “the protective foods.” Published by the Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research, 1943.