Applied Trophology, Vol. 1, No. 6
(June 1957)

Contents in this issue: “The Constipation Syndrome,” “Tip of the Month (Waning Sex Drive),” “Ike’s Doctor Declares U.S. ‘Most Unhealthy in the World,’” “High Points of Standard Process Nutritional Adjuncts (Niacinamide B6).” The following is a transcription of the June 1957 issue of Dr. Royal Lee’s Applied Trophology newsletter, originally published by Standard Process Laboratories. The Constipation […]

Applied Trophology, Vol. 1, No. 4
(April 1957)

Contents in this issue: “The Ideal Drinking Water,” “Vitamin B Complex in Diabetes,” “What Do Patients Like About a Doctor?” “Tip of the Month (X-ray Burn Treatment),” “Questions and Answers,” “High Points of Standard Process Nutritional Adjuncts (Choline, Okra Pepsin E3, Disodium Phosphate, Inositol, Soybean Lecithin, Prolamine Iodine).” The following is a transcription of the […]

Guideposts to Mental Health

By Dr. Royal Lee

Summary: Dr. Lee addresses some possible nutritional causes of mental distress. People who eat too many acidifying foods, such as whole grains, may become overly acidic, marked by symptoms of irritability, introversion, and the feeling of not getting enough air. People who eat too many alkalizing foods, such as green vegetables, on the other hand, may feel aches in their joints or a nervous stomach. Dr. Lee also quotes Dr. Benjamin Sandler‘s description of people who suffer from drastic swings in blood sugar: “Dizziness, faintness, nervousness, tremors, sweating, pallor, flushing, palpitation, tachycardia (rapid heart), abdominal pain, and psychoneurotic manifestations may occur,” Sandler says. To combat such sugar swings, Lee recommends—in words that speak to any nutrition practitioner today—to “avoid refined sugars as found in doughnuts, pies, cakes, ice cream, candy and other forms of sweets.” From Let’s Live magazine, 1958.

The Schizophrenic Pattern

By Dr. George Goodheart

Summary: In spite of nearly a century of medical investigation, schizophrenia remains a baffling disease in both its cause and treatment. While pharmaceutical drugs have long been the backbone of conventional therapy, such drugs tend to simply mitigate symptoms of the illness while often inducing severe side effects. In this fascinating article from 1970, acclaimed chiropractor and nutritionist Dr. George Goodheart—the father of Applied Kinesiology—presents an alternative therapy for the disease that combines upper spinal adjustments with dietary supplementation with niacin and/or niacinamide (aka “vitamin B3”). In a wide-ranging discussion, Dr. Goodheart details the characteristic responses of schizophrenics to muscle testing along with the origins of the “adrenochrome hypothesis” of schizophrenia, which proposes that the disease is caused by psychopathological metabolites of adrenaline that are degraded in normal individuals but remain unmetabolized in schizophrenics (and can be broken down by niacin). While medicine currently discredits the adrenochome hypothesis, over the years many healthcare professionals—both alternative and conventional—have reported positive results in treating schizophrenia with niacin, suggesting that while the mechanism originally proposed by adrenochrome hypothesis may not be entirely accurate, the therapy suggested by the theory is effective nevertheless. From The Digest of Chiropractic Economics, 1970.