Applied Trophology, Vol. 8, No. 11: Comments on Saccharin; Facts About Proteins; Cholesterol-Lowering Effects of Rolled Oats; Medical Students Fail to Eat Well

Contents in Volume 8, Number 11 (November 1964): Additional Comments on Saccharin, A Few Facts About Proteins, Cholesterol-Lowering Effects of Rolled Oats , Medical Students Fail to Eat Well. The following is a transcription of the November 1964 issue of Dr. Royal Lee’s Applied Trophology newsletter, originally published by Standard Process Laboratories. Additional Comments on […]

Applied Trophology, Vol. 8, No. 1: Effect of Hard Water and MgSO4 on Rabbit Atherosclerosis

Contents in Volume 8, Number 1 (January 1964): Effect of Hard Water and MgSO4 on Rabbit Atherosclerosis. The following is a transcription of the January 1964 issue of Dr. Royal Lee’s Applied Trophology newsletter, originally published by Standard Process Laboratories. Effect of Hard Water and MgSO4 on Rabbit Atherosclerosis John B. Neal, MD, and Marybelle […]

Applied Trophology, Vol. 7, Nos. 10, 11, 12: Highlights of Heart Progress; Symposium on Chemical Carcinogenesis; Dental Caries and the Pediatrician

Contents in Vol. 7, Nos. 10, 11, 12 (October/November/December 1963): Highlights of Heart Progress—1961, Excerpts from Symposium on Chemical Carcinogenesis, Editorials: Dental Caries and the Pediatrician. The following is a transcription of the combined October/November/December 1963 issue of Dr. Royal Lee’s Applied Trophology newsletter, originally published by Standard Process Laboratories. Highlights of Heart Progress—1961 Public […]

Applied Trophology, Vol. 1, No. 5: Management of the Hypercholesterol Patient; Tip of the Month (Menopausal Hot Flashes); Pharmacology and Physiology of Vitamin Action; Book Review: The Pulse Test

Contents in Volume 1, Number 5 (May 1957): The Management of the Hypercholesterol Patient, Tip of the Month (Menopausal Hot Flashes), The Pharmacology and Physiology of Vitamin Action, Book Review: The Pulse Test by Arthur F. Coca. The following is a transcription of the May 1957 issue of Dr. Royal Lee’s Applied Trophology newsletter, originally […]

Fat and Its Utilization in Cholesterol Control

By Dr. George Goodheart

SummaryIn 1961 the American Heart Association (AHA) officially endorsed the “diet-heart hypothesis,” the idea that overconsumption of dietary fat increases the risk of heart attack. In particular the AHA condemned saturated fat, a type of fat found primarily in animal foods. Holistic health practitioners balked at the idea of this natural substance causing an unnatural condition such as heart disease and sensibly claimed that, if anything, synthetic fats such as hydrogenated fats and heat-processed plant oils—introduced just prior to the rise of the heart disease epidemic—were likely to blame. These natural healers proved to be prescient, as research in recent decades has shown a correlation between the consumption of hydrogenated fats and heart disease while failing to show such a connection for natural saturated fat. (Ironically, many of the early studies “supporting” the diet-heart hypothesis lumped hydrogenated fats and saturated fat into the same category.) In this article from 1965, famed chiropractor Dr. George Goodheart dispels myths about the diet-heart hypothesis—including the idea that cholesterol is a toxin—and explains why natural fats actually aid proper cholesterol metabolism, not hinder it. He goes on to suggest that overconsumption of refined carbohydrates, not natural fat, is likely the biggest dietary cause of heart disease—a hypothesis explored in scientific detail in the seminal 2007 book Good Calories Bad Calories. From the Digest of Chiropractic Economics, 1965. Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research form VH-1 75. 

High Blood Cholesterol and Its Control

By Dr. Royal Lee

Summary: While cholesterol has been demonized by modern medicine, wise health practitioners know that it is, in fact, an essential component for the proper functioning of the human body. In this 1956 article, Dr. Royal Lee describes cholesterol’s vital role as a “sealing compound” in controlling the diffusion of substances across cell and blood vessel walls. Dr. Lee condemns hydrogenated fats and refined vegetable oils in particular for disturbing the normal cholesterol balance in the body, one probable cause of their effect being the massive loss of nutrients—including the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K and the essential-fatty-acid complex vitamin F—incurred during refining. From Natural Food and Farming, 1956.

Natural Oils

By Dr. Royal Lee

Summary: In this paper on the relationship between cooking fats and blood cholesterol, pioneering nutritional therapist Dr. Royal Lee emphasizes the importance of phospholipids in the former for metabolizing the latter. While natural, unrefined oils such as crude peanut oil contain such phospholipids, he says, synthetic hydrogenated fats do not (because they are destroyed in the manufacturing process). Dr. Lee cites studies in which a diet of high-fat, high-cholesterol foods cooked in unrefined natural oil led to a decrease in blood cholesterol, whereas a diet of foods cooked in hydrogenated fats raised it. From Vitamin Products Company, circa 1956.