Applied Trophology, Vol. 8, No. 2 (Feb. 1964): Lecture by Melvin E. Page; Metabolic Catalysts; Lysine in Human Nutrition

Contents in this issue: “Lecture by Melvin E. Page, DDS,” “Metabolic Catalysts: The “Living Units” of Cells,” “Lysine in Human Nutrition.” The following is a transcription of the February 1964 issue of Dr. Royal Lee’s Applied Trophology newsletter, originally published by Standard Process Laboratories. Lecture by Melvin E. Page Taken from a lecture by Melvin […]

Applied Trophology, Vol. 1, No. 7 (July 1957): The Sedimentation Rate; Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Attack Deaths Among Women; Hot Weather; Q&A; Cardiotrophin PMG

Contents in this issue: “The Sedimentation Rate—Its Significance,” “Cardiovascular Diseases Treated with a Total Extract of Heart Muscle—A Clinical Experience,” “Heart Attack Deaths Increase Among Women,” “Tip of the Month (Hot Weather),” “Questions and Answers,” “High Points of Standard Process Nutritional Adjuncts (Cardiotrophin).” The following is a transcription of the July 1957 issue of Dr. […]

Applied Trophology, Vol. 1, No. 4 (April 1957): Ideal Drinking Water; Vitamin B Complex in Diabetes; What Do Patients Like About a Doctor; X-Ray Burn Treatment; Q&A; Choline, Okra Pepsin E3, Disodium Phosphate, Inositol, Soybean Lecithin, Prolamine Iodine

Contents in this issue: “The Ideal Drinking Water,” “Vitamin B Complex in Diabetes,” “What Do Patients Like About a Doctor?” “Tip of the Month (X-ray Burn Treatment),” “Questions and Answers,” “High Points of Standard Process Nutritional Adjuncts (Choline, Okra Pepsin E3, Disodium Phosphate, Inositol, Soybean Lecithin, Prolamine Iodine).” The following is a transcription of the […]

Applied Trophology, Vol. 1, No. 3 (March 1957): Diabetic Syndrome; Virus Infections and Vitamin E; Q&A; A-C Carbamide, Cardiotrophin PMG, Chlorophyll Complex

Contents in this issue: “The Diabetic Syndrome,” “Tip of the Month (Virus Infections and Vitamin E),” “Questions and Answers,” “High Points of Standard Process Nutritional Adjuncts (A-C Carbamide, Cardiotrophin PMG, Chlorophyll Complex).” The following is a transcription of the March 1957 issue of Dr. Royal Lee’s Applied Trophology newsletter, originally published by Standard Process Laboratories. The Diabetic […]

Introductory Pages of Lectures of Dr. Royal Lee, Volume I

By Mark R. Anderson

Summary: The mid-twentieth century was a time of unprecedented discovery in the science of nutrition. At the head of the field was Dr. Royal Lee (1895–1967), a Milwaukee dentist who combined an uncanny grasp of the physical sciences, agriculture, physiology, biochemical manufacturing, and clinical application of nutrition to lead a revolution in our basic understanding of food and health. Dr. Lee spent much of his time—and money—disseminating the truths he unearthed to the public, his audience ranging from homemakers to healthcare practitioners of every stripe. In the book Lectures of Dr. Royal Lee, Volume I, Selene River Press presents thirty-seven of Dr. Lee’s most notable talks, the titles of which are shown here along with the prefatory pages of the the book, including Mark R. Anderson’s stirring introduction on “The Lee Philosophy”—one of the most insightful commentaries ever written on the life and work of the twentieth century’s foremost nutritionist. From Lectures of Dr. Royal Lee, Volume I (Selene River Press, 1998).

Applied Protomorphology: The Physiological Control of Growth and Repair

By Dr. Royal Lee

Summary: In this eye-opening 1952 article, Dr. Royal Lee outlines the basic mechanism behind autoimmune disorders—something that alludes medical science to this day. Under normal circumstances, Dr. Lee writes, growth factors specific to each tissue in the body, which he calls “protomorphogens,” are released into the bloodstream by the tissues’ cells. To keep protomorphogens from causing runaway growth of their corresponding tissue, the body produces antibodies to neutralize them. When a tissue (or organ) becomes overworked, it begins to produce an abnormally high amount of its protomorphogen. This, in turn, causes the body to produce an abnormally high amount of antibodies. If the amount of antibody exceeds the amount of protomorphogen, the excess antibodies begin attacking the actual cells of the tissue—what has come to be known as an “autoimmune reaction.” Not only did Dr. Lee identify and explain such reactions over seventy years ago, he also developed food-based supplements that thwart them, as he describes in this article. With medicine still groping to explain why autoimmune reactions occur and at a loss as to how to stop them, Dr. Lee’s words are nothing short of astounding. 1952. 

Factors Favorable and Unfavorable to Cancer

By Dr. Royal Lee

Summary: In this brief but poignant passage, Dr. Royal Lee observes that cancer tends to develop only in people with a weakened or imbalanced endocrine system. Healthy thyroid function in particular, he says, is critical in defending against the disease. This includes optimizing the effect of the gland’s hormone thyroxine by ensuring adequate levels of vitamin F, a complex of fatty acids that was recognized in the early days of nutrition as an essential nutrient in food but is inexplicably unacknowledged today. While vitamin F works synergistically with thyroxine to help prevent cancer, Dr. Lee says, one substance that should be avoided is anterior pituitary growth hormone, or “human growth hormone” (HGH). This compound, popular among bodybuilders and athletes today for its performance enhancement, is a “most potent stimulator of cancer,” he warns, and any product that might contain it should be categorically avoided in treatment of the illness. Published by the Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research, 1955.

The Chemical Background of the Relation Between Malnutrition and Heredity

By Dr. Royal Lee

SummaryIt’s been said that Dr. Royal Lee’s theories were typically fifty years ahead of their time. In this astounding lecture from 1956, the great pioneer of nutrition science presents two “radical” ideas now considered revolutions in scientific thought. First, Dr. Lee challenges the principle of classic genetics theory that, barring a mutation in a person’s DNA, that individual will pass on a clean genetic slate to his or her children. Instead, Dr. Lee states, any defect caused to a person during his or her lifetime by malnutrition is likely to be inherited by the individual’s future children—a fact thoroughly substantiated by the new science of epigenetics. Dr. Lee then discusses the science behind his remarkable Theory of Protomorphology, the first known account of autoimmune disorders. According to Dr. Lee’s theory, the growth and repair of body tissues is controlled by a careful balance between, on one hand, growth-promoting antigens produced by (and unique to) each type of tissue and, on the other hand, antibodies produced by the body’s autoimmune system. If the amount of antibodies exceeds the normal balance, then those antibodies attack the tissue—or an “autoimmune reaction” occurs. Though it would take decades for conventional science to catch up with Dr. Lee, today autoimmune reactions are considered a leading cause of disease and death in America. From Natural Food and Farming, 1956. 

Protomorphology: The Principles of Cell Auto-Regulation

By Royal Lee and William A. Hanson

Summary: The complete book on the subject of the Protomorphogen. In this seminal work, Dr. Royal Lee connects the dots between the endocrine, nutritional, and cellular control mechanisms of the living human cell as well as how growth and repair in the body are regulated. This is the basis for Dr. Lee’s theories of autoimmune disorders, in which he detailed the immune system’s ability and tendency, under conditions such as nutrient deficiency, to target the body’s own tissue. Lee’s visionary tome was released decades before any understanding of autoimmune disorder was acknowledged or accepted by medicine or any other field of healing. Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research, 1947.

View PDF: Protomorphology: The Principles of Cell Auto-Regulation

Chiropractic Reactions in the Light of Protomorphology

By Dr. George Goodheart

Summary: In this 1951 article, Dr. George Goodheart, founder of applied kinesiology (AK), discusses the Protomorphogen Theory of Dr. Royal Lee in relation to the mechanisms of chiropractic treatment. This is one of Dr. George Goodheart’s earliest professionally published articles. From The Journal of the National Chiropractic Association, 1951. Reprinted by the Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research

Royal Lee, DDS: The Father of Natural Vitamins

By Dr. David Morris

Summary: “One of the intellectual giants who contributed to our contemporary high standard of living and knowledge of human nutrition was Dr. Royal Lee,” writes Dr. David Morris in this excellent biography of the twenty century’s foremost natural nutritionist. “Even though his name is known to only a small number of Americans,” Morris adds, “Dr. Lee was a researcher, inventor, scientist, scholar, statesman, businessman and philanthropist of the first order.” Indeed. From the Weston A. Price Foundation, 2000.

Nutrition and Vitamins in Relation to the Heart

By Richard L. Chipman, MD

Summary: In this profound lecture from 1953, Dr. Richard Chipman elucidates the differences between natural and synthetic vitamins in terms of their effects on the human heart. Whereas lab-made vitamins comprise single chemical compounds, he explains, natural vitamins—or vitamins as they are found in food—are infinitely more complex, comprising “groups of associated principles of synergistic nature” that, if taken apart, “are no longer capable of producing [their] normal nutritional and metabolic effect.” Thus it is no surprise, he adds, that in studies synthetic vitamins failed to show positive effects on heart health, and in some cases even made matters worse, while natural vitamin complexes proved literally to be lifesavers. Dr. Chipman’s words will make you reconsider not just what vitamins truly are but what they are truly capable of in restoring human health. From The Journal of Medical-Physical Research, 1953. Lee Foundation for Nutritional Research special reprint 5-54.